This Is More Than Beer To Me

qiuxiaHeadshot
From Qiuxia

I always wanted a beer that represents where I am from. A beer that reminds me of home and great times with friends. I want to make that connection and I want to share my story with you. I had the opportunity to sit down with a good friend Frank from the Minnesota Skinny who is always interested in finding stories like this. Instead of writing another blog post, I think I will just share with you what he has written. As always, he does a great job capturing every little detail.  Cheers!

Making 明: The Story of Boom Island’s New Asian-Inspired Ale

Ask Boom Island Brewing Company co-owner Qiuxia Welch about beer back home and she’ll take you to the streets of Chengdu, a city of 14 million in the Sichuan Province of China. She’ll verbally serve you up some of that notorious Sichuan cuisine, known for deep flavors but also for the lip-numbing peppers. She’ll offer your imagination a fresh, light beer; a simple beer, but a rescue craft from the blazing delirium you’ve eaten yourself into.

Now, as the Minneapolis-based brewery cruises toward seven years in business, she and her husband – fellow co-owner and head brewer Kevin Welch – launched a beer that brings Qiuxia back to those Chengdu streets.

(Ming). It means “Clarity,” but it’s also how you say “Minnesota” in Chinese. The characters on the bottle’s label were drawn for them by a friend back in Chengdu – the original drafts were drawn up on rice paper with a horsehair feather pen and black ink.

“We talk about the connection with Belgian beer [here], but we also talk a lot about the culture here, being bilingual, multicultural, how we spoke Chinese here when we first came,” says Qiuxia. “To have a beer with a Chinese name, that means almost more than beer to me.”

Qiuxia lived in Chendgu from birth until she moved to the Twin Cities area in 1996 to pursue music studies at Augsburg College. She’s lived in the Cities more or less ever since; but, interestingly, she first met Kevin at a French horn symposium in Beijing (they’re both longtime horn players and have been involved in local orchestras, if you’ve ever wondered about the French horns in Boom Island’s branding).

“A bunch of weird geeky French horn players from all over the world get together for a week,” says Qiuxia. “All they think, drink, eat, whatever, is French horn. Lectures, conferences, exhibits. I thought, ‘Oh, I would never go to one of those things.’ I was never geeky like that … and Kevin had gone to every single one.”

That was the year 2000. By the end of 2001, Kevin and Qiuxia were married.

The Welches lived in China from 2005-2006, and it was during this time Kevin says an Asian-inspired beer was first imagined. His home-brewing adventure had begun long before that stay overseas, but his fascination with fermentation and yeast strains connected him with distillers in the rural countryside.

“None of [the operations were] commercial,” says Kevin. “It was all just, Grandma in the back room cooking it up on New Year’s Eve.”

He explained his home-brewing interests to locals and exchanged stories. He heard about yeast strains that have been passed down from generation to generation over hundreds of years, and the making of Baijiu. He made beer during his stay, too, something Qiuxia said made them popular in town.

“There are no home-brew shops in China, and you couldn’t just buy all those fancy things online, so it took a whole month to put together a home-brew thing that worked,” she recalls. “We didn’t have bottles and we couldn’t buy commercial, so we had a whole neighborhood saving bottles and cleaning for us. And we didn’t have caps – you buy them either 100,000 at once or nothing – so we taught everybody, whenever they drink beer, they had to open very carefully because we were re-using the caps.”

Twelve years on, things have gotten a bit more sophisticated.

The making of Ming involves the use of sticky rice, in addition to long-grain rice; Pilsner malt; bittering hops, and bitter orange peel; and Tahoma hops, added toward the end of the boiling process. An ale yeast is used, as neutral a yeast as Kevin could find.

At 4.2 percent alcohol, Ming is inviting indeed – should you, perhaps, lose count of drinks while you desperately fight the scorch of hot noodles. It’s light and clean, with just enough citrus and bitterness in the finish to let you write “citrus and bitterness in the finish” but not enough to overpower a steamed pork bun or a Shanghai pancake.

Qiuxia says half the brewery is represented in this beer’s making and branding, but she doesn’t mean only herself: her parents, “Hu Baba” and “Hu Mama”, traveled from Chengdu to help build the brewhouse while Boom Island was getting started.

“[Hu Baba] was my plasma-cutting extraordinaire,” says Kevin. “There was nothing more this guy loved than to get out there in his flip-flops, plasma-cutting eighth-inch stainless [steel]. This big jagged edge would come down; he’d shimmy out of the way, and light a smoke off the ember that was still red-hot on the edge of the sheet metal.”

“There were some wonderful tears and sweat, everything,” says Qiuxia. “It was really the best time we had, even though it was the most difficult.”

Hu Baba and Hu Mama never saw the finished brewery, and won’t likely – Qiuxia says they avoid flying now – but the Welches visit at least twice a year and of course they bring samples. Kevin says Hu Baba will hold up bottles and say, “This is my company!”

To which he’ll respond: “You’re right. You built that thing. That is your company.”

Ming was welcome in the taproom last Friday with a weekend party that featured Mahjong lessons, a table tennis tournament, and a lion dance. It debuted off-site Tuesday at Tea House in Minneapolis. More information can be found on Boom Island Brewing Company’s website or their Facebook page.

Vegetarian Dumplings with Silvius

In honor of Chinese New Year, Boom Island Brewing’s Co-Owner Qiuxia Welch shares an amazing recipe for Vegetarian Dumplings, paired beautifully with Sylvius.

Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC
Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC

Vegetarian Dumplings
Yield: 35 to 40 dumplings
Time: About 1½ hours

1 tablespoon sesame oil
¼ cup tablespoon canola or peanut oil
1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
3 scallions, thinly sliced
3½ ounces shiitake mushrooms, trimmed and chopped
¼ large Savoy cabbage head (about 6 ounces), chopped

4 scrambled eggs
2 tablespoons soy sauce
35 to 40 wonton wraps

  • For the Dipping Sauce:
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 4 teaspoons light soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons rice vinegar
  • 1 scallion, sliced
  • Chilli oil to taste

1. Put the sesame oil and 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large skillet over medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the ginger, scallions, and mushrooms, and cook until the mushrooms release their liquid, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the cabbage and ¼ cup water and cook, stirring occasionally, until the cabbage is very soft, about 20 minutes. Add the soy sauce and cook until it reduces to a glaze, 2 to 3 minutes, then remove from the heat. Add scrambled eggs.

2. Fill a small bowl with water, and lay a wonton wrap on a clean work surface. Use your fingers to lightly wet two adjacent edges of the wonton wrap, then put a heaping teaspoon of the cabbage mixture in the center of the wrap. Fold the wrap over to form a triangle, and press to adhere the wet edges to the dry edges. Repeat with the remaining wonton wraps and filling.

Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC
Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC

3. Put the remaining 3 tablespoons canola oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When it’s hot, add a single layer of dumplings and cook until golden brown on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes, then turn and cook until lightly browned on the other side, another 2 to 3 minutes. Drain on paper towels, and repeat with the remaining dumplings. Serve hot or warm.

Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC
Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC

For a slightly healthier alternative, you can boil the dumplings instead of pan frying them. Simply bring water to a boil and cook dumplings 2-3 minutes.

Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC
Photos by Heather Hanson Photography LLC

For the ultimate experience, serve with a pint of Boom Island Brewery’s Silvius Pale Ale!